On display!

While cleaning up after working on the low raised bed, I noticed a new addition to our found-object “art” display.

It’s a snoozy Rolando Moon!

The cats really love this table I dragged out of the bushes. 😀

The Re-Farmer

Stuff we’ve found, and things to fix

While doing my evening rounds, I figured it was time to get a recent photo of our found object “art” display. 😉

The table itself was dragged out from under a fallen tree while clearing the edge of the spruce grove. We weren’t able to get at it until the old wood pile was cleaned up. The chair frame (barely visible at the bottom) was found somewhere else in the yard.

My daughter showed me where they found that crushed tea kettle, and now I’m even more perplexed as to why it was there and how it got crushed. Being driven over is not as likely as I thought, since it was in between some trees, where no vehicle – not even an ATV – could fit. The steel trap and the strip of rusted metal beside it was buried in the dirt under where the wood pile used to be, found while clearing out roots to turn the space into garden beds. Quite a few of what’s on there was found while cleaning up that old wood pile! The beer bottle was found along the East fence line along the spruce grove, most likely left there by my late brother. He did like his beer! The group of three cups to the right of the tea pot, plus the two Old Spice bottles, are the newest additions, found by my daughter in the junk pile way out by the plowed field.

While walking around and thinking of the things we need to do, and what we need to do it, I decided to drag something out of one of the sheds. We’d seen some wire mesh fencing rolled up in a corner, and I thought it might be useful for when we build our trellises or something. So I moved a few things to get to the corner, dragged it out and brought it to the house.

I was really surprised. There is a LOT more in there than I thought there was. As far as I have seen, we don’t have any fences made with this wire, so I have no idea why it’s here or what it was used for. Whatever it was for, not much of the roll was used!

This will come in very handy.

This morning, after switching out the memory cards on the trail cams, I took another look at the fence by the gate post, where we want to put in a small people gate. The gate post itself has three holes in the steel where we could potentially attach things. At the moment, the ends of the barbed wire are attached to the post through these holes. We’ll have to put in a new post first, attach the wire to the post, then detach the wire from the gate post. We still need to settle on how wide we want the gate to be, before we know where to put in a post.

While looking at where the barbed wire was attached to the gate post, I noticed this.

*sigh*

It wasn’t like this in the fall. This is damage from temperature fluctuations over this past winter.

I checked the other sides, and the other gate post. The other gate post has no cracks in the concrete at all, but this one…

These are the two corners of the south facing side.

These are the west and east facing sides.

I don’t know that these can be patched, or if the base needs to be replaced. I recall my brother telling me about a particular type of concrete he wants to use to repair the cracks in the bottom portion of the barn wall, that could probably be used on these cracks. I will bow to his greater knowledge and ingenuity on this one!

Well, this does show which post was responsible for the gate shifting. When we hung the gate back up after repairing our vandal’s damage, it was level. Over the winter, it shifted enough that the pin for the sliding bar could no longer be used. By the end of the winter, however, the gate shifted back, and the pin can be used again. My daughter had thought it was the other gate post that had shifted, but with these cracks, I’d say it was this one!

Since I had to slip through the fence to get pictures on all sides of the gate post’s base, I decided to check out the fence line from that side. New fence posts had been put in until just past the end of the spruce grove. The rest of the fence has been slowly falling down. From the outside, I was able to shift the posts – they are so rotted, they’re broken loose at ground level – so that they were leaning into the yard, rather than towards the road.

The entire stretch of fence is basically toast. I think there might be one fence post that isn’t broken. At one point, I noticed a large tree had fence wire on either side of it. One of the wires had a break repaired. It looks like, when the break was fixed, whoever did it deliberately put the wire on the other side of the tree, so the tree would keep the fence up.

For that spot, at least, it’s working.

I will have to prioritize cleaning up along this fence line, so it can be repaired. We’ll need to pick up more fence posts; I’ve found some scattered all over the place, but I don’t think there are enough, and they’re different sizes, too.

My daughter just popped in and we talked about the fence. If we were just replacing a post or two, we could make do with the old post hole diggers we found around the property. However, there are just too many posts to replace for that to be practical for us. We’re not that able bodied! And since the equipment that we could have used is gone (the Bobcat had a soil auger attachment), or no longer functional (the post pounder my late brother built), we figure it might be better to just hire someone. All we really need is for the posts to be installed. Once they’re in, we can do the rest ourselves. Since this is a permanent fence line, we would also want to not just have posts in dirt, but to install them in such a way that they won’t rot away as quickly.

We also want to move away from barbed wire, so we would probably want to install posts closer together, and use other materials. We might start off with the “rustic look” and use materials on hand to make a simple rail fence, until we can come up with something more durable and permanent – and preferably deer proof!

But first, that section of fence line needs to be cleared. We’ll lose a lot of privacy in the process, but once the corn and sunflowers are grown in, that will suffice for the summer, at least.

Little by little, it’ll get done!

The Re-Farmer

I have questions about this.

Yesterday evening, the girls decided to go out for a walk and headed out past the barn.

They found this, among the trees.

A squashed kettle.

Among the trees.

I have questions.

How did it get squished like this?

And why was it out there to get squished, in the first place?

When I was a kid, we had a large pig pen beyond the barn and, after that, there was a large manure pile. Past that was trees. Just trees. Nothing where someone might set up a kettle, then mysteriously leave it there to be crushed.

The girls have set it with my “art display” of other found objects. 😀

Ah, the things we find! 😀

The Re-Farmer

We got a worm

Yes! I have a name for it!

I remembered to ask my brother about the insanely heavy-for-it’s-size object I’d dug out of the grass.

He called it a worm drive.

Inside are gears that convert the energy from high speed rotation into slow speed rotation with high power.

I did some searches and found it under terms like worm gear box, worm reduction drive, worm gear reducer, and so on. I even found some similar to ours, though none quite like it. It even looks like the Ohio brand is still around.

Another one of those “ah, one of those things I understood but didn’t know the name of.”

Definitely something we want to try and protect from further damage!

The Re-Farmer

Clean up: old dog houses moved

Brrr, today has turned out to be chilly!

With some help from my daughter, though, I was able to get a lot more done outside than I expected.

First on the list was to move the old dog houses to what I hope will be a permanent – or at least long term – location.

Unfortunately, things are really level in the area I wanted to put them. After discussing it a bit, we decided which space was the most level, then hoisted the dog houses over.

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Some manual labour, and getting things started

After dropping one daughter off at work, my other daughter and I did a whole bunch of manual labour around the yard.

The first thing we did was haul away the stuff I’d clean up in the old wood pile area, including moving the pile of debris to the back of the outhouse, and sorting through the pile of found objects and garbage.

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